This Society of Economic Geologists Compilation (no. 4) contains more than 100 years of classic papers on gold (-silver) ores in epithermal deposits from 1905 to 2010. These include the manuscripts published in Economic Geology, Reviews in Economic Geology, Special Publications, Economic Geology Monographs, SEG Newsletters, SEG Field Trip Guides, and Economic Geology Anniversary Volumes. They feature many of the major gold (-silver) deposits, which formed in Mesozoic and younger magmatic arcs of the circum-Pacific, southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. They also include the rare older deposits occurring in Australia, Sweden, and Canada. Papers describing deposits containing predominantly silver ores are presented because they contain significant gold, they have similar geological characteristics, and/or they provide broader insights to epithermal ore-forming processes.

This compilation is divided into 10 sections, beginning with Review Papers and Ore Deposit Models, which comprise the classic and modern review papers on epithermal mineralization. They document key geological features and important genetic processes, regarding mineralogical and textural characteristics of ore mineralization, hydrothermal alteration zonation, classification schemes, local and regional controls on mineralization, and relationship to volcanic settings (Sillitoe and Bonham, 1984; Hayba et al., 1985; Heald et al., 1987; Sillitoe, 1993; White and Hedenquist, 1995; Cooke and Simmons, 2000; Hedenquist et al., 2000; Jensen and Barton, 2000; Sillitoe and Hedenquist, 2003; Simmons et al., 2005).

The next six sections represent studies on specific deposits and districts subdivided by geographic region. These are summarized in Table 1, which lists the major deposits and districts in this compilation and which includes several of the largest gold (-silver) deposits in the world: Yanacocha, Peru; Ladolam, Papua New Guinea; Pueblo Viejo, Dominican Republic; Cripple Creek, USA; Pascua-Lama, Chile and Argentina; El Indio, Chile; Round Mountain, USA; Hishikari, Japan; Tayoltita, Mexico; Rosia Montana, Romania; Martha Hill, New Zealand; Kelian, Indonesia; Comstock, USA; Acupan, Philippines; Emperor, Fiji; Pachuca-Real del Monte, Mexico; Guanajuato, Mexico; and Fresnillo, Mexico. There are four complete SEG Guidebooks on epithermal deposits of Bulgaria, Japan, New Zealand, and the western Carpathians. In addition, there are a few papers on deep igneous-hydrothermal processes normally associated with porphyry mineralization, where there are clear links to the formation of shallow-formed epithermal deposits (e.g., Losada-Calderon and McPhail, 1996; Hedenquist et al., 1998 ; Ulrich et al., 2001; Masterman et al., 2005; Baumgartner and Fontbote, 2009; Bendezu and Fontbote, 2009).

The last three sections contain papers on Hydrothermal Processes and Modern Environments; on Research Methods, Remote Sensing, and Exploration; and on those of Historical Interest (1950 and earlier). Here, the complete Reviews in Economic Geology volume 1 (Henley et al., 1984) and most of volume 2 (Adams, 1985; Berger and Silberman, 1985; Bodnar et al., 1985; Field and Fifarek, 1985, Fournier, 1985a and b, Henley, 1985; Henley and Brown, 1985; Reed and Spycher, 1985) are found, with many important papers on geochemistry, gold transport-deposition, boiling effects, hydrothermal mineralogy, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes, and hydrothermal systems (e.g., Browne, 1969; Weissberg, 1969; Haas, 1971; White, 1974; Hedenquist and Henley, 1985a; Brown, 1986; Brown, 1989; Seward, 1989; Spycher and Reed, 1989; Giggenbach, 1992; Rye, 1993; Simmons and Browne, 2000; Simmons and Brown, 2007). Exploration relevant papers describe methods of detecting key mineralogical patterns from aerial and satellite images (Rockwell et al., 2006; Crosta et al., 2009; Taranik et al., 2009). Lastly, and largely for historical context, early issues of Economic Geology contain the first publications on epithermal deposits (e.g., Lindgren, 1907; Ransome, 1907; Finlayson, 1909; Rogers, 1911; Lindgren, 1922). These workers and their peers knew that much could be learned from examination of modern hydrothermal environments (e.g., Lindgren, 1910; Emmons and Larsen, 1913; Allen, 1935), a feature that continues to inform us of ore-forming processes today.

Gold (-Silver) Ores in Epithermal Deposits: Preface

Владелец инбокса: kaptar.j

This Society of Economic Geologists Compilation (no. 4) contains more than 100 years of classic papers on gold (-silver) ores in epithermal deposits from 1905 to 2010. These include the manuscripts published in Economic Geology, Reviews in Economic Geology, Special Publications, Economic Geology Monographs, SEG Newsletters, SEG Field Trip Guides, and Economic Geology Anniversary Volumes. They feature many of the major gold (-silver) deposits, which formed in Mesozoic and younger magmatic arcs of the circum-Pacific, southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. They also include the rare older deposits occurring in Australia, Sweden, and Canada. Papers describing deposits containing predominantly silver ores are presented because they contain significant gold, they have similar geological characteristics, and/or they provide broader insights to epithermal ore-forming processes.

This compilation is divided into 10 sections, beginning with Review Papers and Ore Deposit Models, which comprise the classic and modern review papers on epithermal mineralization. They document key geological features and important genetic processes, regarding mineralogical and textural characteristics of ore mineralization, hydrothermal alteration zonation, classification schemes, local and regional controls on mineralization, and relationship to volcanic settings (Sillitoe and Bonham, 1984; Hayba et al., 1985; Heald et al., 1987; Sillitoe, 1993; White and Hedenquist, 1995; Cooke and Simmons, 2000; Hedenquist et al., 2000; Jensen and Barton, 2000; Sillitoe and Hedenquist, 2003; Simmons et al., 2005).

The next six sections represent studies on specific deposits and districts subdivided by geographic region. These are summarized in Table 1, which lists the major deposits and districts in this compilation and which includes several of the largest gold (-silver) deposits in the world: Yanacocha, Peru; Ladolam, Papua New Guinea; Pueblo Viejo, Dominican Republic; Cripple Creek, USA; Pascua-Lama, Chile and Argentina; El Indio, Chile; Round Mountain, USA; Hishikari, Japan; Tayoltita, Mexico; Rosia Montana, Romania; Martha Hill, New Zealand; Kelian, Indonesia; Comstock, USA; Acupan, Philippines; Emperor, Fiji; Pachuca-Real del Monte, Mexico; Guanajuato, Mexico; and Fresnillo, Mexico. There are four complete SEG Guidebooks on epithermal deposits of Bulgaria, Japan, New Zealand, and the western Carpathians. In addition, there are a few papers on deep igneous-hydrothermal processes normally associated with porphyry mineralization, where there are clear links to the formation of shallow-formed epithermal deposits (e.g., Losada-Calderon and McPhail, 1996; Hedenquist et al., 1998 ; Ulrich et al., 2001; Masterman et al., 2005; Baumgartner and Fontbote, 2009; Bendezu and Fontbote, 2009).

The last three sections contain papers on Hydrothermal Processes and Modern Environments; on Research Methods, Remote Sensing, and Exploration; and on those of Historical Interest (1950 and earlier). Here, the complete Reviews in Economic Geology volume 1 (Henley et al., 1984) and most of volume 2 (Adams, 1985; Berger and Silberman, 1985; Bodnar et al., 1985; Field and Fifarek, 1985, Fournier, 1985a and b, Henley, 1985; Henley and Brown, 1985; Reed and Spycher, 1985) are found, with many important papers on geochemistry, gold transport-deposition, boiling effects, hydrothermal mineralogy, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes, and hydrothermal systems (e.g., Browne, 1969; Weissberg, 1969; Haas, 1971; White, 1974; Hedenquist and Henley, 1985a; Brown, 1986; Brown, 1989; Seward, 1989; Spycher and Reed, 1989; Giggenbach, 1992; Rye, 1993; Simmons and Browne, 2000; Simmons and Brown, 2007). Exploration relevant papers describe methods of detecting key mineralogical patterns from aerial and satellite images (Rockwell et al., 2006; Crosta et al., 2009; Taranik et al., 2009). Lastly, and largely for historical context, early issues of Economic Geology contain the first publications on epithermal deposits (e.g., Lindgren, 1907; Ransome, 1907; Finlayson, 1909; Rogers, 1911; Lindgren, 1922). These workers and their peers knew that much could be learned from examination of modern hydrothermal environments (e.g., Lindgren, 1910; Emmons and Larsen, 1913; Allen, 1935), a feature that continues to inform us of ore-forming processes today.

Прикрепленные файлы
Категория: Полезные ископаемые Метки: Золото,Полезные ископаемые,
573.98